This blog is a WIP - shortly it will become something bigger, badder, better.

**None of the pictures provided are of mine, but mainly come from the internet. If otherwise stated, I do not take ownership of the following works of art. But please do feel free to check out my personal work.

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**Ningun de los picturas mostrados son de mios, pero vienen mayormente por el internet. If otherwise stated, No soy dueño de ningun obra de arte, sin embargo digo en cambio. Pero que miras lo que he hecho personalmente.

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Bassmen with 96 notes

bassman5911:

DEFCON 0 by johnsonting

23rd July 2014

Audio post

Source: SoundCloud / Kimbramusic

23rd July 2014

Audio post

Source: SoundCloud / Skribbles N Bits

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from artissimo with 432 notes

mathiaszamecki:

Black and white comps

Source: mathiaszamecki

22nd July 2014

Audio post

This is my song for the day, hits home.

Tagged: place like thisa place like thismajid jordan

Source: SoundCloud / Majid Jordan

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Ravage with 7,316 notes

Source: dearscience

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from CG Pinups with 48 notes

Sometimes.. the rough simple, angled look is really awesome to me.

Sometimes.. the rough simple, angled look is really awesome to me.

Source: deviantart.com

21st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sink00 with 2,401 notes

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

Source: projecthabu

21st July 2014

Audio post

Source: SoundCloud / Majid Jordan

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Pinup Arena with 135 notes

mandyandnothingmore:

Mandy Figure!!
This is the 3D model of a figure of Mandy, is a limited edition. If you want to get information about the project or want to buy a figure enters http://www.mandystatues.com/

mandyandnothingmore:

Mandy Figure!!

This is the 3D model of a figure of Mandy, is a limited edition. If you want to get information about the project or want to buy a figure enters http://www.mandystatues.com/

Source: mandyandnothingmore